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Give Props

This week’s trek is inspired by Nic Marks' research on what makes employees happy and organizations effective.

Ever been dogged by your team?

It can be totally deflating when you are working hard and getting the job done, but others don’t seem to care or notice.

On the flip side, when our contributions at work are acknowledged we
 feel more motivated and connected to our team.

Introducing Your Give Props Exercise

What It Is
A chance to give props to the people that make life better for you at work.

Why We Love It 
It's easy to assume that what is on your plate is all that matters without ever taking a minute to recognize all the people you depend on to get your shit done. This exercise lets you take a minute to acknowledge the hard hustle of others. 

How It Works
1. As you go through your workday, take note of all the people you interact with and the specific role they play in making things run smoothly. Who empties your trash can? Replenishes snacks? Sets the agenda for your meetings? Provides you with that helpful stat or article, so you can backup your argument?

2. Of the people in #1, take a moment to think about the contributions that you feel genuinely grateful for. Make a list of the 2-3 reasons why you are particularly thankful for their work/effort. 


3. Next time you see the person in #2, offer up a thank you and be specific about why what they do is so appreciated by you. If it feels appropriate and you are in a position to do so, send a note to this person's boss or supervisor to let them know what a positive impact their team member is having on you.

Want to dig deeper? 
  • For a three-minute inspiring TED talk on the power of saying thank you, check this out
  • For a summary of research that supports the importance of gratitude in the workplace, read this from FastCo.
  • For tips on how to give praise to others and mean it, read this.
Here's what your fellow trekkers have to say about past treks:

"Inspiration Reservoir was one of my favorite treks. It helped me understand the many sources of inspiration (many of which are in my own backyard) that I can draw upon when needing to unlock the right side of my brain."

-Liz Tverskoy, Account Manager @ Google
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Shankar Desai
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Life Goals

This week’s trek is inspired by Dr. Sim B. Sitkin's research at Duke on setting goals.

When was the last time something blew your mind?

If you fall into the gunner category, you're accustomed to regularly achieving the short-term accomplishments set for you at work. Even though all that #winning is great, sometimes our focus on work can overshadow the life goals we might want to set for ourselves.

According to Todd Henry from Accidental Creative, if we spend a little time imagining the things that would blow our minds if they happened, we can tap into deeper motivations that would best support our life goals. 

Introducing Your Life Goals Exercise

What It Is
A 20-minute exercise for dreaming big.

Why We Love It 
When we get super focused on the here and now we can lose sight of some of the bigger things that both inspire and motivate us. This exercise is a chance to dream big so you can identify some of your underlying motivations and set new stretch goals.

How It Works
1. Take 15 minutes to list out at least 20 things that would blow your mind (in a good way) if they happened. Try to list as many things as you can in the time allotted. If you get stuck, think across categories like relationships, family, fitness, health, career, fame, travel, investments, and ambitions. 

2. When you are done, take a look at your list and look for common themes or patterns across. Are relationships a big theme for you? How about status, wealth, work, or health? 

3. Given your response in #2, identify the patterns that reflect how you currently spend your time. Which patterns would you like to see more or less of?

4. Of the patterns you want to see more of pick 1-2 that you'd like to focus on within the next few years and take a few minutes to turn it into a stretch goal. Let's say health is the theme you selected -- you might consider setting the goal of running a marathon or climbing a mountain in the next year. The key is to pick something that isn't easily attainable and will push the boundaries of what you currently see as possible for yourself.


Source: AC

Want to dig deeper? 
Here's what your fellow trekkers have to say about past treks:

"I really liked the
Feedback Champ Trek. I found it particularly useful as I reflect on my areas of development, which can be difficult to accept and action. Instead of being nervous I'm choosing to be excited - increasing awareness of my triggers, keeping an open mind and focusing on constant improvement." 

-
Jared Zlotnick, Group Manager, Google Marketing Solutions
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Copyright © 2018 LifeTrekkers, All rights reserved.

Want more information? Drop us a line at info@lifetrekkers.me.

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Shankar Desai
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Breathing Room

This week’s trek is inspired by Liz Wiseman’s research on leadership and collective intelligence.

Are you the person everyone relies on for answers?

We all have certain areas of expertise that others regularly rely on us for. Sometimes, though, our tendency to have all the answers makes it impossible for others to step up on their own.

In her research on leadership, Liz Wiseman talks about the importance of being a leader who knows when to take a back seat so other people have a chance to learn and grow. 

Introducing Your Breathing Room Exercise

What It Is
A 10-minute exercise to identify some of the ways you can take a step back and empower others to step up. 

Why We Love It 
We all enjoy being in the company of people who give us room to breathe. This exercise provides a quick way to consider how you can shift your behavior so others can grow.

How It Works
1. Identify a meeting this week where you’d like to create more space for others to contribute. 

2. Ask yourself what kind of energy you typically display in meetings. Consider how your behaviors might be preventing more junior people on your team from developing their own skills in that same area. Some examples:

  • Are you the first one to have an answer, serving to keep others from having their own point of view?
  • Are you constantly coming up with ideas, making it hard for others to formulate their own and/or identify the top priorities?
  • Are you always communicating the big picture, serving to keep others from learning how to craft a vision?
  • Are you quick to speak up and put your thoughts, reactions, and feelings out there, leaving little room for others to have a say?

3. Based on #2, consider playing a different role in your next meeting, so others have a chance to step up. Instead of offering up your ideas, try building on those of others. Or rather than providing all the answers, try asking questions to steer the group towards their own meaningful conclusions. 

4. After your meeting, reflect on how the dynamic shifted. What knowledge did you gain about your team and about yourself? What strengths can you see in team members that weren't apparent before? How might you further cultivate those strengths moving forward?

Want to dig deeper? 
Here's what your fellow trekkers have to say about past treks:

"The What's Your Tutu? trek couldn't have come at a better time. I've always had a hard time showing emotion in romantic relationships, so it's helpful for me to to check in with these questions after a date."

Beebe Xia, Copywriter and Single Lady
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Click here to subscribe to the weekly email!

Copyright © 2018 LifeTrekkers, All rights reserved.

Want more information? Drop us a line at info@lifetrekkers.me.

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You can unsubscribe from this list.
Shankar Desai